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Type II Diabetes Independently Suppresses Viability of Isolated Stromal Vascular Fraction
Phoebe L. Lee1,2, Shawn Loder1, Sarah Seman1, Lauren Kokai1
1University of Pittsburgh, Department of Plastic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

Background: Adipose-derived cellular therapeutics are gaining popularity as an abundant, minimally invasive, bioactive therapeutic with a range of desirable cellular and signaling functions. These effects are believed to derive primarily from the adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), comprised of all non-lipid laden cells. SVF is a clinically relevant population with the potential to be isolated and reinjected same day in patients. Over the course of therapy, multiple SVF injections may be required. In our experiences, SVF yield and viability have been variable across patients. Other studies have found contradicting correlations between SVF yield and patient age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, physical activity, and harvest site. We summarize our findings from SVF isolations across varying patient demographics. Methods: Adipose tissue from 25 donors from 2019-2020 were harvested under IRB exemption. Adipose was digested with collagenase in a 1:1 ratio to yield the SVF. Cell viability and counts were determined with Trypan blue staining. Outcome measures included tissue weight, SVF yield, and viability. SVF yield was standardized to tissue weight. Patient demographics included age, sex, BMI, diabetic status, and cancer status. Result:s Average donor age was 49.1 years, and patients were primarily female (21/25). Average BMI was 31.8 (range 21.7-42.9) with 21/25 having a BMI>25. There were 6/25 diabetic patients. BMI was the best predictor of SVF viability. Patients with BMI>25 had significantly less SVF viability (average 85.7%, range 63%-95.5%) than those with BMI25 and diabetes were also found to be positively correlated (p25 (average 1.78x105, range 5.1x104 1.17x105 cells/g), although not statistically significant (p=0.16) (Figure 1C). Interestingly, diabetic patients had higher SVF yield per tissue weight (average 1.11x105 cells/g, range 4.92x104 2.60x105 cells/g) than non-diabetic patients (average 8.46x104 cells/g, range 1.81x104 1.17x104 cells/g) although not statistically significant (p=0.30) (Figure 1D). Sex, age, and cancer status had no significant impact on SVF viability or yield per tissue weight. Conclusion:s BMI and diabetic status impacted SVF yield and viability the greatest. These variables may be used to predict SVF harvest in patients undergoing ASC cell-based therapy.


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